Dr. Kusseluck in NY, NY office
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Botox® Therapy
Juvederm
Radiesse®
Belotero Balance®
Sculptra
Restylane
Chemical Peels
Acne Scars
Micro Dermabrasion
Photodynamic Therapy
Sclerotherapy
Lesion Removal
Age Spot Removal
 
Laser Treatments
Ruby Laser
Sun Spot Removal
Tattoo Removal

BBL™
Rosacea
Melasma
ProFractional Therapy™
Contour TRL™
Laser Hair Removal
Laser Resurfacing
 
Patient Information (PDF)
ABCD's of Skin Care
 
Acne

Acne is the term for the blocked pores (blackheads and whiteheads), pimples, and deeper lumps (cysts or nodules) that can appear typically on the face, neck, chest, back, shoulders and upper arms. Seventeen million Americans currently have acne, making it the most common skin disease in the country. While it affects mostly teenagers, and almost all teenagers have some form of acne, adults of any age can have it. Acne is not life-threatening, but it can cause physical disfigurement (scarring) and emotional distress. Treatment varies depending on the type and severity of lesions, skin type and the patient’s age and lifestyle, but on average results are visible in six to eight weeks.

Eczema

Eczema is a general term encompassing various inflamed skin conditions. One of the most common forms of eczema is atopic dermatitis (or "atopic eczema"). Approximately 10 percent to 20 percent of the world population is affected by this chronic, relapsing, and very itchy rash at some point during childhood. In general, atopic dermatitis will come and go, often based on external factors. Although its cause is unknown, the condition appears to be an abnormal response of the body’s immune system. In people with eczema, the inflammatory response to irritating substances overacts, causing itching and scratching. Eczema is not contagious and, like many diseases, currently cannot be cured. However, for most patients the condition may be managed well with treatment and avoidance of triggers.

Psoriasis

Psoriasis is a term that encompasses a group of chronic skin disorders that affect any part of the body from the scalp to the toenails, but most frequently affect the scalp, elbows, knees, hands, feet and genitals. Over seven million men and women in the U.S. of all ages have some form of psoriasis, which may be mild, moderate or severe. In addition it may be categorized into different types: plaque, pustular, erythrodermic, guttate or inverse psoriasis. Most forms involve an itching and/or burning sensation, scaling and crusting of the skin.

Psoriasis cannot be cured but it can be treated successfully, sometimes for months or years and occasionally even permanently. Treatment depends on the type, severity and location of psoriasis; the patient’s age, medical history and lifestyle; and the effect the disease has on the patient’s general mental health. The most common treatments are topical medications, phototherapy, photochemotherapy (PUVA), and oral or injectable medication (for severe symptoms).

Rosacea

Rosacea is a chronic skin disease affecting about 14 million Americans that causes redness and swelling on the face and also occasionally the scalp, neck, ears, chest, back and/or eyes. Although it can affect anyone, rosacea typically appears in light-skinned, light-haired adults aged 30-50. Symptoms range from red pimples, lines and visible blood vessels to dry or burning skin and a tendency to flush easily, but many people find that the emotional effects of rosacea – i.e. low self-confidence and avoidance of social situations – are more difficult to handle than the physical ones. It is not yet known what causes rosacea and the disease is not curable, although it can be treated in many ways, including topical and oral medications, laser therapy and laser surgery. Early detection and intervention are essential to achieve the most effective results, or to reduce the severity of symptoms if rosacea has already progressed.

Vascular Malformations

Capillary vascular malformations (telangiectatic naevi or nevi) are sometimes referred to as flat haemangiomas. However, these are not haemangiomas but are malformed dilated blood vessels in the skin. Lesions are non-cancerous and appear as blotches of red or purple skin discolouration on any part of the body. They are always present at birth, although they may become more obvious with time. They may vary in size from a small dot to occasionally involving a whole limb, and they grow in proportion to the child's general growth.

ABCD's of Skin cancer

While prevention is your best defense against skin cancer, if a melanoma should develop, it is almost always curable with early detection. Check your skin regularly for changes or new lesions. Compare each mole to the pictures found in the comparison chart.

 
©2007 Eric Kusseluk, MD |212-753-1909 | 635 Madison Ave. | New York, NY 10022